Your Dog and Small Critters – By Ben Kersen

Your Dog and Small Critters
By Ben Kersen

In this video clip I talk about how to create a dog that is good with small critters whether it’s chickens, squirrels, rabbits or cats.  If your dog has already established bad habits with these animals, the approach may vary.

Until Next Time,
Ben Kersen
Ben Kersen & the Wonderdogs
Victoria, BC
http://www.wonderdogs.ca

crittering ben kersen

 

Common Client Complaints – Housebreaking Issues – By Ben Kersen

Common Client Complaints – By Ben Kersen (written by Nancy Noden)
Housebreaking Issues

A common complaint that we hear from future clients of Ben Kersen and the Wonderdogs is difficulty in teaching a puppy or young dog to be housebroken.

Ben Kersen’s approach is one of prevention, make sure that your dog does not have the opportunity to do it’s business in the house.  Ben says “If you are holding your puppy in your arms, very few will have an accident in this situation”.  If you are using a crate with your dog, put them in the crate if you are unable to watch them.  Another safe situation is to put the dog outside in a secure fenced yard as ideally this is where you want them to go.

DSC_0034Clients will often forget to watch their puppy when they are inside and this is when the accidents happen, the pup will go off into a corner of the house and do it’s business.  Instead, Ben recommends watching your puppy like a hawk and taking it outside frequently.  Don’t forget the importance too of praising it immediately when it does it for going in the correct area.

Ben has had great success using this method with his own Wonderdogs to the point that one of his dogs, Shiloh, never had an accident in the house in her many years in the Kersen household.

Until Next Time,
Ben Kersen
Ben Kersen & the Wonderdogs
http://www.wonderdogs.ca

Complaints from Clients – By Ben Kersen

Complaints from Clients
By Ben Kersen

When meeting a new client (whether they are interested in our Group Dog Training Classes, Individual Dog Training Lessons or our Professional Dog Trainers program) they come with some common complaints and negative attitudes about their dogs.  They are often at their wits end and mentally have their dog partway to the local animal shelter.  Most have tried other dog trainers with little to no luck and have pretty much given up all hope of living the life they envisioned when they first brought their furry friend home.  Thankfully, for whatever reason, they decided to give their dog one last try and called Ben Kersen and the Wonderdogs for help.  And I am always so glad they did as most of the problems I see can not only be resolved but can be resolved very quickly.

Over the next few blogs I will cover some of the most common dog complaints we get from our new customers and outline some steps in dealing with these issues.

Client Complaints - Ben Kersen & the WonderdogsUntil Next Time,
Ben Kersen
Ben Kersen & the Wonderdogs
Victoria, BC
www.wonderdogs.ca

 

Puppy Proofing the House – By Ben Kersen

Puppy Proofing the House

By Ben Kersen

Ben KersenOne of the most common complaints we get from clients when they call Ben Kersen & the Wonderdogs is “my puppy chewed my _____” or “peed of my _____”!  Don’t let this be you!

Before bringing your future wonderdog home, it’s important to check each room of your house for items that may be hazardous. All household cleaners, bleaches, oils, chemicals of any sort should be kept in a high, and preferably locked cupboard.

All electrical cords should be dabbed with jalapeno pepper juice, lemon juice, bitter apple, or some other substance that will taste terrible to the chewing puppy. If you have a Mexican dog or a dog that just won’t take “no” for an answer, try Dave’s Insanity Sauce (this sauce is available in the specialty food section of most grocery stores).

It is important to have lots of chew toys for puppy (as an alternative to your furniture and electrical cords). However, with the exception of Kongs and some of the hard rubber Nylabones, almost any chew toy will break down under determined chewing. Be sure to replace such toys before they become small enough to be swallowed.

For more on things to consider before brining your puppy home, think about doing a consultation with a professional dog trainer.  My business, Ben Kersen and the Wonderdogs offers this service at a good rate.  Visit my website for more information: www.wonderdogs.ca

Until Next Time,
Ben Kersen
Ben Kersen and the Wonderdogs
Victoria, BC Canada
www.wonderdogs.ca

Your Dog’s Safety Inside a Car – By Ben Kersen

Your Dog’s Safety Inside A Car
By Ben Kersen

If you were involved in a car accident, would your dog be safe? If your dog is free in the car, it could be thrown into a window, out of the car, or otherwise injured.

At Ben Kersen and the Wonderdogs we believe in safety first.  The following are options for save travel for your dog:

1. Traveling crates: many people crate their dogs in a vehicle. This will be the safest if the crates themselves are thoroughly secured to the body of the vehicle.

2. Seatbelts: there are now a variety of dog seatbelt products that can be used in conjunction with human seatbelts.

3. Dividers: in station wagons and vans, dividers can be secured in a vehicle to create a special place for your dog. In pick-up trucks, your dog(s) may ride in a sturdy, canopy-enclosed box.  This option obviously isn’t as safe as the other two options as your dog can still be tossed a good distance in the event of an accident.

 

Traveling crates, dog seatbelts, and dividers can be purchased at most pet shops. Of course, these alternatives are only going to work if you use them consistently. If you have two or three dogs, ‘ buckling up ‘ before every drive can be time consuming. You will need to judge the value of the companionship and petting time you and your dog (s) share when they can sit beside you against the need for these vehicle safety measures.

Heat in Cars
If the temperature rises to 20°C outside, a dog left in a car may be at risk. With direct sunlight, the temperature in your car will rise dramatically. Even with all four windows open, a dog can suffer heat stroke very quickly on a hot day. Heat stroke can be fatal. In hot weather, parking in the shade or using sun reflector blankets to cover the front window can help, but they are no guarantee of safety. Always avoid leaving your dog in a hot car for its comfort, as well as its safety.

Car Windows
The “‘Houdini Dog'” syndrome can strike if you leave your car windows open too wide. The rule of thumb is that the window should not be open wider than the dog’s head. If a dog can get its head out the window, then it CAN get the rest of its body out.

Car Doors
Just a reminder: car doors are heavy and can cause serious injury. So when putting “Fido” in the car, hold the door until you are absolutely sure that all dog parts and the entire leash are well inside the car. Also, never slam the car door. Close it slowly holding the handle in case of “doggie door dash”.

Car Manners
When driving, the last thing you need is a hairy projectile ricocheting around the car. Also, never let your dog fire out through the car door as soon as it is opened. Teach him/her to sit and wait until given your “okay” to exit safely (more to come on this topic in an upcoming video blog). Car manners are easily taught with a little time and consistency. This a service that Ben Kersen and the Wonderdogs provide.  Visit our website for more information: www.wonderdogs.ca.

Until Next Time,
Ben Kersen
Ben Kersen & the Wonderdogs
Victoria, BC
www.wonderdogs.ca

 

Ben Kersen – Complaints from Clients About their Dog’s Safety Around Cars

Common Complaints from Clients – Their Dog’s Safety Around Cars

By Ben Kersen

A common complaint I receive from my future Wonderdog clients is about the fact that their dog has no car sense!  Do you remember being taught as a young child to look both ways before crossing the street? Picture the scene: you are playing fetch with your dog. The ball gets knocked out into the street and your dog races after it unaware of anything else including the approaching car.…

Over one million dogs are hit by motor vehicles annually. This statistic should be a big incentive for you to car-proof your dog.  I have offered car proofing through my business, Ben Kersen & the Wonderdogs for over 30 years now and am confident that I have saved many dogs’ lives because of it.

Ben Kersen & the Wonderdogs’ car proofing training teaches your dog:

1. to jump back whenever a vehicle comes directly toward it.2. never to go off curb onto asphalt unless you given your “okay”.

3. to always sit at every curb before crossing the road.

Ben Kersen - Dog SafetyThese three techniques can be taught quite easily and are invaluable in saving your dog’s life. Visit our website for more information:www.wonderdogs.ca.

Remember you should ALWAYS use a leash when walking near traffic as things can happen quickly. The only exception is if your dog has been through our advanced car proofing training, and even then, you must always be very careful.

Until Next Time,
Ben Kersen
Ben Kersen & the Wonderdogs
Victoria, BC
www.wonderdogs.ca

Safety and Your Dog

Safety and Your Wonderdog (or perhaps not so much of a Wonderdog!):
By Ben Kersen

“Ben, be careful.” “Ben, don’t fall dear.” “Ben, look out for the…” These were the constant reminders during my childhood from Mrs. Kersen, my dear mother. Despite her best intentions, I managed to acquire my share of scraped knees and bumped foreheads.

As doggie parents, we are responsible for our four-legged children’s safety. Speaking of children, could you imagine leaving a young toddler to play near traffic without supervision? If you love your dog, and want to enjoy its company to a ripe old age, I would encourage you to take the same precautions as you would for a baby and more—dogs are MUCH faster!! Since opening my business (Ben Kersen and the Wonderdogs) 30 years ago, I have seen some close calls… don’t let this be you!

All the good nutrition, training, and your loving care can be destroyed instantly by an accident if your dog isn’t safety trained. The next few blog posts (which were taken from my previous newsletter, Ben Kersen and the Wonderdogs News & Tips) will offer general suggestions, but should not be used instead of going for active training with a qualified trainer.  For more info on training, visit my website www.wonderdogs.ca.

Until Next Time,
Ben Kersen
Ben Kersen & the Wonderdogs
Victoria, BC